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Margaret (McMullian) Pugh

Photo of Margaret (McMullian) Pugh
1946
Biography

Margaret Pugh served as one of the first women leaders in the management of Alaska’s correctional system. During her career she worked at McLaughlin Youth Center, Johnson Youth faculty and several state prisons, including as Superintendent of Lemon Creek Correctional Institution. She served as Commissioner of Corrections in the Knowles Administration from 1994 t0 2002.

During her tenure she introduced and implemented the concept of Restorative Justice, which emphasizes treatment for mental health and substance abuse for prisoners to reduce recidivism.  She established the first institution for female offenders and replaced the last of the old territorial prisons.

Governor Knowles said, “Margaret Pugh emphasized the importance of keeping prisoners in touch with their family, so she maximized in-state facilities rather than sending prisoners to private outside facilities. She fought for juvenile justice reform and zero tolerance of child abuse. Her public service helped advance a better and safer society for Alaska”

Pugh’s involvement in Girl Scouts in Alaska dates back to the early 70’s. She served first as a troop leader, then as camp facilitator (persuading people to donate their boats, trucks, buses, and helicopters for the camp), travel coordinator (helping coordinate little girl scouts from across Southeast back and forth between their homes and Juneau which included housing girls while waiting for state ferries. Years later she served as a board member and then as board chair for the Tongass Girl Scouts, continuing during the merger with Susitna Council to form the Girl Scouts of Alaska.

On reflection, Pugh expressed gratitude for all who taught, inspired and mentored her on her journey in Alaska. She and her husband John Pugh, former Chancellor of the University of Southeast, raised two children who became able and generous adults who provided two beloved granddaughters, Sophia and Elle.

Induction ceremony acceptance speech https://youtu.be/bsS2JtlLTxo

Notes

 

Margaret Pugh served as one of the first women leaders in the management of Alaska’s correctional system. During her career she worked at McLaughlin Youth Center, Johnson Youth faculty and several state prisons, including as Superintendent of Lemon Creek Correctional Institution. She served as Commissioner of Corrections in the Knowles Administration from 1994 t0 2002.

During her tenure she introduced and implemented the concept of Restorative Justice, which emphasizes treatment for mental health and substance abuse for prisoners to reduce recidivism.  She established the first institution for female offenders and replaced the last of the old territorial prisons.

Governor Knowles said, “Margaret Pugh emphasized the importance of keeping prisoners in touch with their family, so she maximized in-state facilities rather than sending prisoners to private outside facilities. She fought for juvenile justice reform and zero tolerance of child abuse. Her public service helped advance a better and safer society for Alaska”

Pugh’s involvement in Girl Scouts in Alaska dates back to the early 70’s. She served first as a troop leader, then as camp facilitator (persuading people to donate their boats, trucks, buses, and helicopters for the camp), travel coordinator (helping coordinate little girl scouts from across Southeast back and forth between their homes and Juneau which included housing girls while waiting for state ferries. Years later she served as a board member and then as board chair for the Tongass Girl Scouts, continuing during the merger with Susitna Council to form the Girl Scouts of Alaska.

On reflection, Pugh expressed gratitude for all who taught, inspired and mentored her on her journey in Alaska. She and her husband John Pugh, former Chancellor of the University of Southeast, raised two children who became able and generous adults who provided two beloved granddaughters, Sophia and Elle.

Induction ceremony acceptance speech https://youtu.be/bsS2JtlLTxo