Class of 2013

Pictured: Judy Brady, Diddy Hitchins, Karen Hunt, Marie Nash, Anne Newell, Carolyn Covington, Jewell Jones

Not pictured: Arne Beltz, Daphne Elizabeth Brown, Joan Hurst, Dorothy M. Jones, DSW, Mary Joyce, Thelma Langdon, Emily Morgan, Ruth E. Moulton

Photo of Arne (Buckley) Beltz

Arne (Buckley) Beltz

19172013
Categories: 2013 Alumnae, Nursing, Public Health

Arne Beltz, with a physician father and a nurse mother, grew up in a household which was built around the patients. Inspired by her father’s dedication to his patients, she chose a career in nursing. While serving in the Public Health Service in Georgia (1946-47), Beltz answered “yes” when her supervisor asked for a volunteer to go to Alaska.

For 32 years (1948-1980), Beltz provided public health services in village Alaska and in Anchorage during polio and TB epidemics and the 1964 earthquake. She pioneered the use of nurse practitioners in Alaska and creatively organized Anchorage entities and federal funds into a training facility for premed, nursing, village aides, public health nurses and others. During her 20 years as manager of the Community Health Services Division of the Municipality’s Health Department, Beltz started the Women, Infants and Children’s Nutrition Program, the Child Abuse Board, Home Health Agency and the Family Planning and Women’s Health Program. Many of the health-related non-profits in Anchorage today owe their origins to the encouragement she gave her staff to engage in community affairs and professional organizations.

Beltz was honored by the Municipality for her many contributions to public health nursing, naming the building which houses the Department of Health and Human Services as the Arne Beltz Building in 1990. In 1991 she was inducted into the Alaska Women’s Commission Hall of Fame. In 2003 she was one of the first four nurses in the state to be nominated to the Alaska Nurses’ Hall of Fame.

She is regarded as a visionary leader in public health, one who shaped its practices and institutions and played a key role in Alaska’s major health events, as well as serving as a mentor and inspiration to all who worked with her.

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19172013
Categories: 2013 Alumnae, Nursing, Public Health

Arne Beltz, with a physician father and a nurse mother, grew up in a household which was built around the patients. Inspired by her father’s dedication to his patients, she chose a career in nursing.

After completing college with a major in biology, Beltz obtained a Masters in Nursing from Yale School of Nursing (1940-42) and in 1947 completed the Public Health Nursing Program at NYU. Initially working as a visiting nurse in New York and in the Philippines as a member of the Army Nurse Corp (1945), she then entered the Public Health Service in Georgia. When the supervising nurse asked for volunteers to go to Alaska, Beltz said “yes.”

She started her nursing career in Alaska in 1948, fighting a TB outbreak in Wrangell and then, as the itinerate public health nurse, served Kake and Angoon (1950-51), supervised the Fairbanks Health Center (1952-56) and then was assigned to Unalakleet and surrounding villages, including Stebbins, St. Michael, Koyuk and Shaktoolik (1954-59). The job of the itinerate public health nurse was around the clock, subject to call at any time, and often the only medical help available. Beltz recalls some of the challenges she faced, such as having to sew up a man’s scalp in Angoon which he had accidentally split open with his ax. She also faced a polio epidemic in Fairbanks with the difficulties of sterilizing and reassembling, after each shot, the glass syringes and needles so each school child could be immunized. Beltz cited her work with infants and babies, as well as with victims of TB, as having provided the most satisfaction. She found working and living in the villages very rewarding and credited the success of the program in those early years to the one-on-one home visits to each family, allowing the nurse to observe and teach and the family to confide.

As manager of the Community Health Services Division of the Municipality of Anchorage Department of Health and Human Services for 20 years (1960-80), she created many new programs and entities. After the 1964 earthquake, Beltz set up and directed diphtheria and typhoid clinics in Anchorage and other locations. In the early 1970s she pioneered the use of nurse practitioners in women’s health in Alaska. Beltz organized the Municipality of Anchorage, the Department of Health and Human Services and federal Title X family planning funds into a training facility for premed, nursing, village aides, public health nurses, students earning their masters’ degrees in social work, medical assistants and nurse practitioners. Under her leadership, the Women, Infants and Children’s Nutrition Program, the Child Abuse Board, the Home Health Agency and the Family Planning and Women’s Health Program were started. Beltz and the division initiated a project to train nurse practitioners to perform certain gynecological procedures and that program received national and international attention. Many of the health-related non-profits in Anchorage exist today due to her encouraging staff to participate in professional organizations and engage in community service.

Beltz was active with the Alaska State Nurses Association, serving as president (1973-75) and was instrumental in educating state legislators about the role of the itinerate public health nurse in Alaska’s villages. She also advocated for the increased roles advanced nurse practitioners would be authorized to perform under the Nurse Practice Act.

Arne married William Beltz and they had four children: Mark, William, Kathy and Axel. William Beltz was elected to both the territorial and state legislatures and served as the first President of the Alaska State Senate.

In 1990 Beltz was honored for her many contributions in public health nursing in both the state and the city by the Municipality which named the building housing the Department of Health and Human Services as the Arne Beltz Building. In 1991 she was inducted into the Alaska Women’s Commission Hall of Fame and, in 2003, was honored to be one of the first four nurses in the state to be nominated to the Alaska Nurses’ Hall of Fame.

One who worked for many years with Beltz summed up her leadership skills by stating: “Arne had the ability to bring out the best in the people who worked with her…she gave them the freedom to do the job…she gave…good direction…creativity flourished…and (she was) a team player herself… . (H)er willingness to lead by example was inspirational to those she worked for and those who worked for her.”

Beltz is regarded as a visionary leader in public health, one who shaped its practices and institutions and played a key role in Alaska’s major health events, as well as serving as a mentor and inspiration to all who worked with her.



Photo of Judith “Judy” (King) Brady 

Judith “Judy” (King) Brady 

1941
Categories: 2013 Alumnae, Public Policy

Judy Brady is respected for her thoughtful, deliberative approach to understanding key public policy issues; her ability to effectively communicate the pros and cons in advising key policy makers on these issues; and an ability to effectively work at resolving differences on difficult issues. Both Republican and Democrat mayors and governors have appointed Brady to public policy boards and commissions, which is indicative of the respect she has earned in her nearly 50 years of involvement in important public policy issues – from Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act to managing Alaska’s resource wealth. Throughout Brady’s career she has displayed leadership in pursuing contentious issues affecting Alaska and as a result has influenced the course of our state’s history.

Early on, Brady became interested in Native land claim issues and Native education issues. She was invited to become one of only a few non-Native board members of the Fairbanks Native Association and later was made an honorary lifetime member of the association. After passage of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, Brady was appointed by the Secretary of the Interior as chief administrative judge of the Alaska Native Claims Appeals Board – the first woman to chair an Interior land appeals board in the United States. When the board finished its appeals eight years later, former governors Walter Hickel (R) and William Egan (D), co-chairs of Commonwealth North, named her as the first woman executive director of that public policy forum. She later became Commonwealth North’s first woman president. Brady served as Commissioner of Natural Resources for the State of Alaska, the second woman to hold that position. She ended her professional career as the first woman executive director of the Alaska Oil & Gas Association.

Throughout her life in Alaska, Brady has been actively giving back to the community and in 2007 received the Anchorage Chamber of Commerce Gold Pan Award for Distinguished Community Service by an Individual.

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1941
Categories: 2013 Alumnae, Public Policy

Judy Brady came to Alaska in l963 to work for the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. She said later that at the time she was disappointed that she had missed the fight for statehood, never guessing what was coming next. What was coming next was the giant Prudhoe Bay oil discovery on Alaska’s North Slope, the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, the building of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline, the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act and the major environmental legislation of the l970s. Through the next 50 years, she would be involved in public policy decisions affected by all of these events. 

Throughout Brady’s career, she has displayed leadership in pursuing issues she believed were important that influenced the course of our state’s history. During her work as a reporter for the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner, she became interested in Native land claim issues and Native education issues. She was invited to be a member of the Fairbanks Native Association board of directors and was later made an honorary lifetime member of the Association.

After the birth of her son, Steve, Brady worked as editor for the Tundra Times while the publisher/editor, Howard Rock, was on sabbatical. During that year she was awarded Best Editorial and Best Feature from the Alaska Press Club.

Initially under contract to edit economic and resource development studies, Brady was named editor of the Review of Business and Economic Conditions for the newly formed Institute of Social and Economic Research (ISER) at University of Alaska in l967, during which she authored a review on “Alaska Native Claims Land Freeze,” among others.

After moving to Anchorage in l970, Brady was co-editor of the Alaska Native Management Report for the newly formed Alaska Native Foundation. Her twin daughters, Erin and Meghan, were born in Anchorage. In l974 the Secretary of the Interior appointed Brady as chief administrative judge of the newly formed U.S. Department of Interior’s Alaska Native Claims Appeals Board. The board was established to hear and decide appeals on land selection decisions arising under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. Board decisions could be appealed to the federal courts, but were final for the Department of the Interior. The decisions determined title to thousands of acres of land contested by the newly formed Native corporations, the State of Alaska, federal agencies and individuals. Board decisions established legal precedent for future land conveyance decisions, including the definition of navigable waters.

The first year hearings were to decide whether or not challenged communities were villages under the definitions of the Claims Act. In some communities armed marshals were present at the hearings. Because the board was located outside of Washington, D.C., and because the board heard appeals from one of newest and most complicated land disposal acts the department had ever attempted to implement, Brady was also given the opportunity to advise the Secretary of Interior on issues requiring policy determination on matters not in front of the board.  The board completed its work in 1982. That same year Commonwealth North co-chairs, former governors Walter Hickel and Bill Egan, selected Brady as the first woman executive director of the organization where she served until 1987. Brady returned in 1996 to serve as Commonwealth North’s first woman president.

Brady continued her public policy involvement by serving as commissioner of the Department of Natural Resources (1987-89) under Gov. Steve Cowper. In this capacity she advised state leaders on key resource development policies. She brought that understanding to her role as executive director of the Alaska Oil & Gas Association, where she served until her retirement in 2007. She was known for her level approach to balancing the state’s rights with the leaseholders of the state’s oil and gas and did so with the respect of her colleagues and foes.

Brady’s list of community involvement, both professional and non-profit, is lengthy and includes many positions of leadership, including chair of the Anchorage Chamber of Commerce. In 2004 she was selected as one of only five women of the Top 25 Most Influential Business Leaders in Alaska by theAlaska Journal of Commerce the article about Brady begins, “. . . it may be easier to list the boards and organizations for which she has not served.” That multi-paged list includes non-profits and professional organizations in Fairbanks, Anchorage and Juneau and many state-wide groups.

Current community involvement: ML&P Commissioner 2011-present,current chair; Mayor’s Energy Transition Team 2008, chair; Mayor’s Energy Task Force 2008-present, past chair and current member; Ted Stevens Airport Stakeholders’ Task Force 2005-present; Lumen Christi High School 2012-present, board member.

Prior community involvement (partial list): Alaska Command Advisory Board, member, 1992-2007; National Security Forum, Air Force War College, Alaska Representative 1993 & 1997; Woman of Achievement 1995; Anchorage Chamber Board, chair, 1992-1993; Commonwealth North, president, 1996; board member, Governor’s Task Force, Alaska Civil Justice Reform 1996; UAA School of Business Dean’s Executive Advisory Council, chair 1994-1996; Women Executives in State Government, national vice-chair 1987-1988; Interstate Oil Compact Commission, national vice chair 1988; First Interstate Bank of Alaska, board member 1987-2005; Alaska Pacific University Foundation, treasurer, 1994-1997; Alaska State Parks Foundation, board of trustees, 1994-1998; Governor’s Task Force, Alaska Civil Justice Report, 1996; Arctic Winter Games, board member, 1995-1996; Alaska Long Range Fiscal Planning Commission, vice chair, 1995; Anchorage Equal Rights Commission, commissioner, 1991-1992; McAuley House, board member, 1989-1992; President’s Roundtable, Alaska Pacific University 1988-1994; Anchorage Charter Review Commission, 1990; Alaska Marine Pilot’s Board, member, 1983-1986; Anchorage Port Commission, 1985-1987; Toastmasters, 1982-1987; Special Olympics Gymnastics Coach, l981-1985. Cub Scouts/Boy Scouts/Girl Scouts/Little League/PTA mom 1970 – 1982.

Community Recognition: Gold Pan Award, Anchorage Chamber of Commerce, Distinguished Community Service by an Individual 2006-2007; Anchorage Woman of Achievement 1995; Anchorage Chamber of Commerce ATHENA Society member 1997; Top 25 Most Influential Business Leaders, Alaska Journal of Commerce 2003 & 2004; Outstanding Service Contributions to the UAA School of Business 1996; Fairbanks Native Association, honorary lifetime member 1971; Who’s Who, American Colleges and Universities 1963.

Professional: Alaska Oil and Gas Association, executive director, 1993-2007; Alaska Municipal Bond Bank, executive director, 1989-1993; State of Alaska, Department of Natural Resources, commissioner, 1987-1989; Commonwealth North, executive director, 1982-1987; United States Department of Interior, Alaska Native Claims Appeals Board, chief administrative judge, 1973-1982; Alaska Native Management Report co-editor, Alaska Native Foundation, 1971-1973; Community Enterprises Development Corporation, research associate, 1970-1971; Institute of Social, Economic & Research, Alaska Review of Economic Conditions, editor, 1966-1970; Tundra Times, managing editor, 1966-1967; Fairbanks News Miner, reporter/news editor, 1963-1966.

Brady received her bachelor’s degree in journalism from Seattle University. Her hobbies are swing dancing and biking. She has one son and twin daughters.

 

References:
Key Players: Charting Alaska’s Future, The Anchorage Times, March 23, l992
Women of Alaska’s Oil Patch, Alaska Oil & Gas Reporter, Spring 2001
Power Players, Alaska Business Monthly, June 2002
Oil, gas trade leader pushes permitting reform, Alaska Oil & Gas Reporter, April 15, 2002
Working Women, Anchorage Daily News, August 30, 2004
Alaska’s Top 25 Most Influential Business Leaders, Alaska Journal of Commerce, July 2003; July 2004
Profiles in Leadership, 2000 ATHENA Society Directory, Anchorage Chamber of Commerce
Judy Brady: Gas Line a Must, Alaska Business Monthly, March 2007



Photo of Daphne Elizabeth Brown

Daphne Elizabeth Brown

19482011
Categories: 2013 Alumnae, Architecture, Civic Involvement

Throughout her life, Daphne Brown maintained an intense curiosity about place in an historical context. From trips to England at a young age to visit her mother’s family to ferreting out old graveyards and rock walls in the New England woods and countryside, Brown developed a keen historical imagination and sense of landscape, families, and communities as they evolved over time. She approached her life in Anchorage and Alaska with a similar curiosity and wonder; often commenting on how privileged she was to be part of an ever-evolving city situated in the wilderness.

Her career as a prominent Anchorage architect reflected her love and respect for place and community. Arriving in Anchorage in 1975 Brown worked for CCC Architects under the tutelage of Ed Crittenden. In 1987 she went to work with Kumin Associates. These 35 years included significant service to her profession and community at national, state, and local levels serving various professional boards and commissions, including multiple terms as chair of the Municipality of Anchorage Planning and Zoning Commission and state and regional licensing boards. Her public service reflected her deep commitment to viewing public planning, not just from the perspective of an architect, but as an active and involved citizen of the community.

This public service commitment started early in her career at CCC, and was reflected in some of her most significant projects throughout the state. It culminated in the Anchorage museum’s expansion project where she led the design and construction team as the project manager for Kumin Associates.

Reviewing the list of Brown’s service and achievements is a history of the growth and development of a remarkable woman, a person who would volunteer to serve and follow through on that commitment for years. She had a passion and a gift for public service and was genuinely committed to the growth and development of her community. She inspired many to follow in her footsteps and fought hard for sound and humane development practices, as well as for the joy a little art can bring into our lives.

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19482011
Categories: 2013 Alumnae, Architecture, Civic Involvement

Daphne Brown was born in Manchester, N.H., and raised in Gardner, Mass. She graduated from Walnut Hill School in Natick, Mass., and went on to the University of Pennsylvania (B.A. 1970) and University of Washington (Master of Architecture 1973). She was awarded a Loeb Fellowship in 1989-1990 for studies at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design. Brown was a principal with Kumin Associates Inc.

Throughout her life, Brown maintained an intense curiosity about place in an historical context. From trips to England at a young age to visit her mother’s family to ferreting out old graveyards and rock walls in the New England woods and countryside, Brown developed a keen historical imagination and sense of landscape, families and communities as they evolved over time. She approached her life in Anchorage and Alaska with a similar curiosity and wonder; often commenting on how privileged she was to be part of an ever-evolving city situated in the wilderness.

Her career as a prominent Anchorage architect reflected her love and respect for place and community. Arriving in Anchorage in 1975 Brown worked for CCC Architects under the tutelage of Ed Crittenden. In 1987 she went to work with Kumin Associates. These 35 years included significant service to her profession and community at national, state, and local levels serving various professional boards and commissions, including multiple terms as chair of the Municipality of Anchorage Planning and Zoning Commission and state and regional licensing boards. Her public service reflected her deep commitment to viewing public planning, not just from the perspective of an architect, but as an active and involved citizen of the community.

This public service commitment started early in her career at CCC and was reflected in some of her most significant projects throughout the state. It culminated in the Anchorage museum’s expansion project where she led the design and construction team as the project manager for the responsible architect. This unique project demanded leading a complex, collaborative effort among the London-based design architect, the owner, the users, multiple specialty consultants and contractors.

Her colleagues said Brown’s special qualities were subtle and quiet, somewhat elusive to define, but charismatic – rather like the qualities of fine architecture. She was smart, thoughtful, headstrong, thorough, persistent, subtle, direct and relatively ego-free. She worked diligently and quietly, not making a big fuss, blazing trails in fields where women were just starting to be accepted. She had a big heart but she also had principles and wouldn’t let kindness sway her position. This kind firmness was a key aspect of her leadership,and probably instrumental in her success at leading the museum expansion to fruition.

Brown started her architectural education at a time when women were a rarity in the field. Over the years she mentored hundreds of aspiring young women through educational outreach in the Anchorage School District gifted program, through outreach and mentoring intern architects in her work and by example in her service work at the municipal, state and national levels of her service organizations.

Brown was a YWCA Woman of Achievement (1994) and a mentor in the ASD programs, and her work was featured nationally in the “Women in American Architecture” traveling show (1978-1988). The American Institute of Architects Alaska Awards programs honored a number of her architecture projects.

Most important throughout her life were family, friends and colleagues. She felt very fortunate to have spent the better part of her life with her husband, Jonathan, and daughter Catherine.

Brown said she believed from an early age the integration of the cultural aspects (art, music, literature) of our society into the political, educational, economic and governmental systems creates a better environment and quality of life for all.



Photo of Carolyn (Huntsman) Covington

Carolyn (Huntsman) Covington

1936
Categories: 2013 Alumnae, Community Service, Education, Political Activism

A strong advocate for innovative and inclusive education, Carolyn Covington earned her master’s degree in Vocational Administration from the University of Alaska Anchorage, and her bachelor’s degree in Business Education from Western State College of Colorado. In addition to a career that spanned teaching roles in Whittier and Palmer and an assistant professor at Mat-Su College (UAA), she worked to procure grant funding that developed a district-wide Diversified Occupations program in the Mat-Su Borough School District and the Skill Center, which provides open-entry, open-exit classes at Mat-Su College. These two programs made it possible for her students, primarily women, to successfully develop office occupations and related skills to complete high school, earn an associate’s degree in Office Occupations and move on to job placement or further education.

 A founding member of the Valley Women’s Resource Center, the first resource and shelter in the Mat-Su Borough for victims of domestic violence and sexual assault, Covington was also a political activist. She served 29 years as secretary of the Alaska Democratic Party and ran unsuccessfully for the Legislature in 1998. She has served as board member of many non-profit organizations and continues to be a strong political voice in the community advocating for women, the disabled and other persons with special needs. She is described as a “model feminist and human being” and was nominated for teaching young women “the way to self-actualization by role-modeling her equal-rights values every waking moment of her life.” 

Covington’s service to the community is extensive. In addition to the Valley Women’s Resource Center, she helped to organize the Mat-Su chapter of P-Flag, was a charter member of Mat-Su Coalition for Choice, served on the board and as president of the board of Valley Hospital Association, and served as a board member and secretary of the Matanuska Valley Federal Credit Union. For 15 years, Covington has served as secretary-treasurer of Valley Residential Services, which provides housing for low-income and other persons with special needs. Her volunteerism and activism have been invaluable to human rights throughout the Mat-Su.

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1936
Categories: 2013 Alumnae, Community Service, Education, Political Activism

With a master’s degree in Vocational Administration from the University of Alaska Anchorage, and a Bachelor of Arts in Business Education conferred by Western State College of Colorado, Carolyn Covington has always been a strong advocate for innovative and inclusive education in Alaska. She began her professional career as a teacher in Whittier, then taught high school in Palmer and ended her professional career as assistant professor at Mat-Su College (UAA).

Covington was successful in receiving grants to develop a district-wide Diversified Occupations program in the Mat-Su Borough School District and another, the Skill Center, providing open-entry, open-exit classes at Mat-Su College. These two programs made it possible for her students, primarily women, to successfully develop office occupations and related skills to complete high school, earn an associate’s degree in Office Occupations and move on to job placement or further education.

Covington was a founding member in 1980 of the Valley Women’s Resource Center, the first resource and shelter in the Mat-Su Borough for victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. As a political activist, she served 29 years as secretary of the Alaska Democratic Party and ran unsuccessfully for the Legislature in 1998. She is a tireless volunteer and board member of many non-profit organizations and continues to be a strong political voice in the community.  Both in education and community service, Covington is known for her advocacy for women, the disabled and other persons with special needs. She is described as a “model feminist and human being” and was nominated for teaching young women “the way to self-actualization by role-modeling her equal-rights values every waking moment of her life.”

Covington’s service to the community is extensive. In addition to being a charter board member and having filled every executive board position for Valley Women’s Resource Center, she helped to organize the Mat-Su chapter of P-Flag, was a charter member of Mat-Su Coalition for Choice, served on the board and as president of the board of Valley Hospital Association, and served as a board member and secretary of the Matanuska Valley Federal Credit Union. For 15 years, Covington has served as secretary-treasurer of Valley Residential Services, which provides housing for low-income and other persons with special needs. Radio Free Palmer, a young community radio station, has profited from Covington’s expertise as treasurer and volunteer.

Covington also maintains financial records for Church of the Covenant, Mat-Su Senior Services, Mat-Su Democrats and Valley Christian Conference. She is also pianist for Church of the Covenant in Palmer.

Covington has received several awards from the Alaska Democratic Party in recognition of her service and achievements: the 1996 Mat Su Democrat of the Year Award; 2002, “Queen Bess” Award given to women for service to party, state, and nation; 2004, Alaska Democratic Party’s Lifetime Achievement Award; 2012, Outstanding Service Award on the occasion of her retirement as secretary. However, Carolyn would say that her greatest achievement is the love of her husband and their large family.



Photo of Diddy R. M. (Seyd) Hitchins PhD, MBE

Diddy R. M. (Seyd) Hitchins PhD, MBE

1945
Categories: 2013 Alumnae, Education, International Relations, Political Science

Passionately committed to international education, Diddy Hitchins devoted her professional career in Alaska to ensuring that University of Alaska Anchorage students and the community had a curriculum that allowed them a real understanding of Alaska’s place in the world.

Born in Scotland and raised in England, she studied politics, sociology and economics and developed an interest in international relations. Arriving in Alaska in 1974 with Cliff Hitchins, her engineer husband, she was hired by UAA and served as the founding chair of the new Political Science Department, creating its internationally focused curriculum.

Hichins then shifted her academic focus from Europe and Africa to Alaska’s neighbors – Canada, the Russian Far East, Japan, the Koreas and China – and pursued an understanding of international relations across the North Pacific and Arctic regions. She founded and directed the innovative, multi-disciplinary and team-taught Canadian Studies Program and the North Pacific Studies Programs at UAA. Hitchins then created the nationally and internationally recognized Model United Nations of Alaska to offer all Alaska high-school students the opportunity to participate in an international simulation, which for many rural youth opened pathways to becoming students at UAA.

Hitchens forged links between UAA and the wider community by sharing her international expertise within organizations such as the Alaska World Affairs Council and the World Trade Center Alaska. She also served for more than 25 years as British Honorary Consul for Alaska and was honored in 2005 when Queen Elizabeth II personally conferred upon her the prestigious “Member of the Order of the British Empire,” or MBE, at Buckingham Palace for her contribution to British-Alaska relations.

In reflecting on her career, Diddy Hitchins said: “The most rewarding experience has been to see my former students – particularly women – pursuing international graduate studies and embarking on careers in the international arena. I am equally warmed by other students who have assumed a variety of roles in Alaska and throughout the USA, whose professional behavior and practice is based on respect for all nations and peoples – values which I also see reflected in my daughter, Dzagbe, who is a successful fashion executive in Seattle.”

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1945
Categories: 2013 Alumnae, Education, International Relations, Political Science

As a founding professor of Political Science/International Studies at University of Alaska Anchorage, Diddy Hitchins brought the world into classrooms in Anchorage. She informed and challenged students to think outside of the U.S.A., about different social, economic and political influences on world affairs. She taught students how to analyze and understand the way different political systems worked and interacted so that students could perform political risk analysis. She compelled students to be critical thinkers and precise writers and to see the U.S. within a global framework, particularly encouraging their analysis of U.S. foreign policy. Hitchins has mentored and inspired generations of students to read, consider, debate and understand why the nation-states of the world have the political systems, international relations and foreign policies that they have. She has taught students not only to understand but also how to evaluate these situations in order to be able to advise policymakers in today’s world. She required them to adopt the interests and articulate the points of view of the countries they represented in the Model United Nations program and to think globally about the worldwide process of governance.

Hitchins designed the Political Science curriculum at UAA and was responsible for teaching Comparative Politics, International Relations, International Law and Organizations, and U.S. Foreign Policy. She also led the way in developing the multi-disciplinary and team-taught Canadian Studies Program and obtained financial support from the governments of Canada and Quebec to launch the effort in Alaska. The UAA program was a founding member of the Pacific NorthWest Canadian Studies Consortium, which developed and offered opportunities for faculty development in British Columbia, Alberta and the Yukon.

As the Cold War receded and opportunities for Alaskans to interact with Russians from the Far East opened up, Hitchins provided briefings on the Russian political system at the request of the governor and the Legislature for delegations going to visit the Russian Far East, and was a member of UAA’s first official delegation to the Russian Far East in 1989. Building on the success of the Canadian Studies Program, she then served as the founding director of UAA’s International North Pacific Studies Program, which covered the North Pacific Region from Hong Kong to Seattle and offered UAA students the opportunity to study China, the Koreas, Japan, the Russian Far East and Western Canada. To develop faculty capacity for this program, Hitchins obtained Fulbright Hays funding for faculty development and student travel in the Russian Far East. Following the development of these programs, much of Hitchins’ research and publications focused on developments in the Arctic with emphasis on the significant role of indigenous peoples in the Arctic and in Alaska.

One of her unique curriculum efforts was the establishment of the Model United Nations Program,which brings high-school students from around the state to participate alongside university students from UAA, University of Alaska Fairbanks and University of Alaska Southeast in an annual authentic simulation of the United Nations. This program focuses each year on a topic of vital interest to Alaskans and Alaska youth. For two decades this program has initiated high-school students from across the state into the world of international studies



Photo of Karen L. (Lueck) Hunt 

Karen L. (Lueck) Hunt 

1938
Categories: 2013 Alumnae, Education, Law

Karen Hunt has been a pioneer in the Alaska legal world: the first woman from Anchorage appointed to serve as a Superior Court Judge (1984-2000); an educator and innovator in the practice of law and a leader of women in the law and in the community. The bench, the bar and the community have recognized her leadership and achievements through such awards as: Alaska Supreme Court Community Service Award; Alaska Bar Association Public Service Award; Anchorage YWCA Woman of Achievement; Anchorage Chamber of Commerce ATHENA Society; University Medal, Alaska Pacific University; and Alaska ACLU Liberty Award.

Hunt was one of the first two women hired by the city’s largest law firm when she arrived in Anchorage in 1973.  On the bench, Hunt initiated various reforms in both civil and criminal practice.   She was elected founding president of the Anchorage Association of Women Lawyers, serving two terms.  Recognized as a leader by her peers, she was one of the first two women elected to the Board of Governors of the Alaska Bar Association.   Hunt also served as president of the Anchorage Bar Association, Alaska Bar Association  and Alaska Conference of Judges – the only person to have been elected as president of all four professional organizations.

Hunt was also an educator. She taught judicial writing to judges throughout this country and abroad. Hunt was one of the first few women invited to join the faculty of the National Judicial College. Her 1994 presentation on evidence is included in the continuing legal education “Masters of the Courtroom” videotape. In 2005-06, Hunt trained more than 200 judges hearing federal Medicare appeals. Recently, she provided conflict-resolution training to more than 1,700 state employees. She also has assisted in the training of union stewards and supervisors.

Hunt has organized, created or helped to govern a wide variety of community organizations, including early efforts to organize women attorneys and political women, and has served on many boards such as Anchorage Opera, APU Board of Trustees and Commonwealth North.

Hunt was raised by a strong mother whose frequent admonishment: “Well, you just don’t treat people that way,” has informed and guided Hunt’s life, career and community involvement.

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1938
Categories: 2013 Alumnae, Education, Law

Karen Hunt has been a pioneer in the Alaska legal world, in her own career as the first woman from Anchorage appointed to serve as a Superior Court Judge (1984-2000), as an educator and innovator in the practice of the law and as a leader of women in the law and in the community. She has been recognized and honored by the bar, the bench and the community for her leadership and achievements through awards such as: the Alaska Supreme Court Community Service Award (2000); the Alaska Bar Association Public Service Award (1994); Anchorage YWCA Woman of Achievement (1992); Anchorage Chamber of Commerce ATHENA Society (2007); University Medal, Alaska Pacific University (2009); and, Alaska ACLU Liberty Award (2010).

Hunt received her B.A. from the University of Nebraska, Kearney (1961) and an M.A in English from California State College, Los Angeles (1968). Prior to practicing law, she taught high school English in Nebraska and California. In 1973 Hunt graduated in the top 10 percent of her class at the USC Law School (one of 11 women), served on the law review and was awarded the Order of the Coif. She arrived in Alaska in 1973, with her four stepchildren, to join her husband and was one of the first two women hired by Anchorage’s largest law firm. Missing the collegiality of her female law school classmates, she decided to invite all 25 women attorneys practicing in Anchorage to lunch. Despite concerns that male members of the bench and bar might take affront, this informal group continued to meet for a monthly luncheon. After several years, the group organized as the Anchorage Association of Women Lawyers (AAWL), with Hunt serving as president for two terms. To raise funding for the organization and to promote recognition of the city’s practicing women attorneys, she designed a course for credit at UAA entitled “Women and the Law,” which she and the other women attorneys taught (1978-82). All income was donated to the AAWL.

Recognized as a leader by her peers, Hunt was one of the first two women elected to the Board of Governors of the Alaska Bar Association in 1977. Later, serving as president, she presided over the completion of the effort to revise the Alaska Bar Exam, which became a model bar exam in the country. In later years she was elected president of the Anchorage Bar Association and then of the Alaska Conference of Judges – the only person to have been elected as president of all four professional organizations. She has also served in national legal associations: the first Alaskan to be elected to the Board of Directors, National Association of Women Judges and vice chair of its foundation; American Bar Association Special Committee on Lawyers Liability; and Advisory Council for Masters of Judicial Studies, University of Nevada (Reno).

During her tenure as judge, Hunt initiated various institutional reforms in effect today: revising procedures, forms and administrative structures affecting the practice of both civil and criminal law. As an example, when presiding over a prison reform class action lawsuit, her rulings led to the establishment of a women’s prison in Alaska. Though she had shifted her professional career from high school English teacher to the legal world, she continued to be an educator throughout her years as attorney and judge and continuing into today’s retirement. Her specialty is judicial writing which she has taught to trial, appellate and administrative judges throughout this country and abroad. Over the years, Hunt has taught a variety of continuing-education legal courses. In 1989 she was one of the first few women invited to join the faculty of the National Judicial College, which is the national center for the training of state court judges. Her 1994 presentation on evidence is included in the 10 state continuing legal education “Masters of the Courtroom” videotape. In 2005-06, Hunt trained more than 200 administrative law judges appointed to the federal Medicare appeals agency where her model decision format was adopted as the template for all agency decisions. It has also been recommended for use by all judges of the federal Board of Patents and Interferences and the federal Equal Employment Opportunities Commission. Recently, Hunt provided conflict-resolution training to more than 1,700 state employees throughout Alaska. She also assisted in the training of union stewards and supervisors. She has taught contract law to judges in Russia and criminal law and procedure to judges from Bulgaria to Nigeria. Hunt clearly enjoys teaching and credits her success to her ability to help people “to connect the dots.”

Arriving during the years when oil money was first flowing, she found Anchorage to be full of opportunities for residents to engage in civic activities and create needed organizations. In particular, she was impressed by Alaska women’s energy, boldness and independence. Hunt actively participated in efforts to train and organize women, Democrats and Republican alike, to become more visible as a presence in political action and to run for public office. These efforts led to the election of the first women to the Anchorage Assembly, to both houses of the Alaska Legislature and to appointments to high level positions and, eventually, to the founding of the Anchorage Women’s Political Caucus.

As a member of Soroptimist International of Anchorage, she focused efforts on raising scholarship money for both young women and mature women wishing to return to higher education. She led the organization as president in 1979 and received its prized “Women Helping Women” award in 2001. From 2000-03, Hunt helped create the Gold Torch Society at her alma mater, University of Nebraska, Kearney, wherein 20 junior and senior undergraduate women interact with successful professional female alumnae from throughout the country for a weekend retreat. During her years in Anchorage, Hunt has served as a member of the board of directors and/or officer of a number of very diverse community organizations, from Commonwealth North (twice president), APU Board of Trustees, Municipality of Anchorage Arts Council, Anchorage Opera, Alaska Public Telecommunications Inc., KAKM radio and the Anchorage Concert Association. Hunt has also served on the advisory councils for Providence Health Care System, Cyrano’s Theatre and currently co-chairs the Anchorage Senior Activities Center Advisory Council. Additionally, starting in 1986 she has provided training throughout the state on individual board member’s rights and responsibilities. She has trained a large variety of non-profit boards such as hospitals, real estate groups, environmental groups, Native corporations and art organizations.

Looking over her varied career, a common thread appears to underlie Hunt’s career as teacher, lawyer, judge and community leader: a concern with equity in our society. For example, as a young high school English teacher in California, she requested a transfer after the 1965 riots in Watts to an African-American high school in Watts to work as a teacher and counselor. Taken under the wing of a group of veteran teachers, she was tutored on black teen culture so that she could relate to the students and their parents and be able to create innovative counseling and enhancement programs of value to them. This same concern pervades her community interests from her involvement in women’s issues and political power to serving on a committee of the First Alaskan’s Institute seeking to foster community dialogues on issues of racial equity in Alaska.

Hunt was raised by a strong mother who allowed her children to explore the world on their own, to be responsible for fixing any problems they created and always to be mindful of the effect of their actions on others. Her mother frequently admonished her children: “Well, you just don’t treat people that way.” Clearly, this guidance has informed and guided Hunt’s life, career and community involvement.



Photo of Joan Hurst

Joan Hurst

19272003
Categories: 2013 Alumnae, Advocacy for Childern, Youth Development

Joan Hurst was a passionate advocate for kids. For 35 years, she created and directed youth development programs within the Alaska Camp Fire Council and established before- and after-school childcare programs to help working parents. She initiated the first water-safety program to teach kids in rural Alaska how to swim, and she also developed the first non-sectarian, co-ed, nationally accredited resident camp in Alaska on Kenai Lake – Camp Kushtaka.

Hurst was raised in Madison, Wisc., and after teaching school for four years, came to Alaska in 1963 to serve as the first executive director of the local Camp Fire Council. Under her leadership, the council grew from a volunteer-driven, club-based program for girls into a comprehensive, co-ed, youth-development organization serving thousands of youth across Alaska.

Upon her retirement in 1998, the organization had grown from serving 350 girls in Anchorage to serving 5,000 girls and boys in Anchorage and Fairbanks as well as communities throughout rural Alaska.

During her tenure, Hurst spurred the national Camp Fire USA to expand its mission to address quality childcare based on the Alaska experience. The national chief executive officer of Camp Fire, Stewart Smith, said: “Joan Hurst created the model for how to provide before- and after-school care. She was a hero throughout the Camp Fire system.”

Former Gov. Tony Knowles said: “Joan’s vision for child care has helped change the lives of thousands of kids for the better.” And former superintendent of the Anchorage School District, Carol Comeau, said: “Joan was a tenacious advocate for kids.”

Before retiring, Hurst negotiated the renewal of a 55-year lease for Camp Kushtaka and, in a forward-thinking move, she named a group of kids as the “stewards” of the camp. In 55 years they will be the adults who were given the responsibility to protect the camp when they were children. In this, as in all matters, Joan Hurst acted on her belief that adults should do right by children.

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19272003
Categories: 2013 Alumnae, Advocacy for Childern, Youth Development

When she was a teenager Joan Hurst loved to go to summer camp, so when she was offered the opportunity to plan a camp in California in 1957 for Camp Fire, she jumped at it. In 1963 she accepted a job as the first executive director for Camp Fire in Alaska. She had only been in Anchorage a year when the office burned down, followed two months later by the 1964 earthquake. After such physical devastation, parents were mostly devoted to restoring their houses and communities, so Hurst initiated the “Gypsy Camper,” a mobile carnival of arts and crafts and summer fun for girls from Homer to Palmer.

In Seward, Hurst and some volunteers established a day camp that provided activities for any girl who wished to come. Ninety-five girls attended, in a week of pouring rain, to engage in Camp Fire’s programs of cooking, hiking, creative arts and an overnight camping trip. The children’s parents, relieved of the responsibilities of child care, were able to devote their full energy to cleanup and reconstruction.

For Hurst, this experience was the beginning of the Council’s Rural Alaska Program. Profoundly saddened and alarmed by the number of children who were drowning in Alaska, particularly in the rural areas, she led Camp Fire to establish a water-safety program in villages. The program promoted healthy life skills and choices such as boating-safety instruction, arts and crafts, cooperative games, hikes, camp-outs, teen activities, service projects and community events. Thousands of kids have learned how to swim and countless lives have been saved because of this program. The program continues today serving more than 1,000 youth in 26 villages across Alaska in 2012.

As society’s values changed, Hurst realized there were many benefits to making the organization even more inclusive. The organization became officially coeducational in 1975 and was renamed Camp Fire Boys and Girls.

As Alaska entered the 1970s and ’80s, and more parents began working full-time outside the home, the problem of unsupervised children in our communities became a critical issue. Along with the population boom created by pipeline construction, there was a rapid growth in the numbers of “latchkey” children. Children were often left unsupervised after school hours with their house keys were hanging around their necks on strings. Hurst and others had a critical role in making the case to the Alaska State Legislature advocating for the state to assist with providing quality child care in Alaska. In 1974 they adopted the Child Care Assistance Program to assist working families with childcare expenses. Today Camp Fire operates 28 municipally licensed before- and after-school programs in Anchorage elementary schools. There are also four community center-based programs in economically challenged neighborhoods. Combined, these programs currently provide 1,400 youth with a safe place to be before and after school each day for working families.

In the early 1960s, under Hurst’s leadership, Camp Fire acquired a land-use agreement from the Department of Natural Resources for the rights to use their property along Kenai Lake to deliver a residential camp experience. She brought together a passionate group of volunteers to build the camp. Hurst designed the cabins so the windows would face the lake so it would be the first thing campers saw when they woke. Hurst loved camp and personally taught canoeing and other water skills to campers. The camp was given the name Camp Kushtaka (now Camp K), and it quickly became that special place young girls wanted to attend each and every summer. It became co-ed in 1975 and is Alaska’s longest-running, co-ed residential camp accredited by the American Camp Association. Today, more than 800 campers have opportunities each summer to explore the natural world around them while gaining self-confidence and learning new skills.

Hurst was also an advocate for women. She strongly believed that women needed opportunities to be empowered to advance in society and she actively provided professional development opportunities for young women. A Camp Fire staff member, Joanne Phillips, spent countless hours working alongside Hurst, and shares this: “Joan took her role as a leader in the community very seriously. Whether you were six or 60, she graciously pushed you to put your very best foot forward; to try new things, constantly reminding you that it was important to finish what you started; to get involved with your community; and she talked endlessly about the importance of educating yourself about all things, big and small.”

Hurst was involved in a variety of community organizations, including the League of Women Voters (who were early advocates for public funding of child care), the Alaska Women’s Political Caucus, the Human Services Coalition and the Anchorage Downtown Rotary Club.

Hurst was recognized as a 1990 YWCA Woman of Achievement – honored for her vision and passion for youth development and supporting working families by providing before- and after-school care for elementary school-age children. She also received the Luther Gulick Award from the National Camp Fire organization and board of trustees recognizing her outstanding leadership in the youth development field – this award is the most prestigious award within the national Camp Fire organization.



Photo of Dorothy M. (Knee) Jones DSW

Dorothy M. (Knee) Jones DSW

19232015
Categories: 2013 Alumnae, Aleut Communities, Anthropology, Women's Therapy

Dorothy M. Jones’ career in Alaska spanned the 1960s through the ’90s, starting with groundbreaking anthropological research in the communities of the Aleutian Chain and the Pribilof Islands. That was followed by 13 years as a professor of Sociology at the Institute of Social and Economic Research and culminated in many years of counseling with women facing domestic abuse and social and economic injustice.

Jones lived and traveled throughout the Aleutian Islands for a decade, leaving briefly to earn her Doctorate in Social Work at the University of California, Berkley. Jones then returned to the University of Alaska in 1968, where she served as a professor of Sociology and wrote Aleuts in Transition: A Comparison of Two Villages (1976) and A Century of Servitude: Pribilof Aleuts Under U.S. Rule (1980), as well as numerous articles about the Aleut people, urban Natives, and women’s therapy.

She was an advocate for women’s rights and in 1977 she co-authored “The Status of Women in Alaska,” which motivated the establishment of the Alaska Commission on the Status of Women. In 1982 Jones founded the women’s counseling program at the Alaska Women’s Resource Center and followed that by establishing the Feminist Therapy Collective and many years of work to improve counseling for women.

As an instructor, therapist and author, Jones inspired generations of women to engage in the fields of social work, anthropological research and community activism. In the past decade, Jones embraced her lifetime dream of writing fiction and is currently working on her third novel.

In reflecting on her life, Jones said: “When I was 15 years old, my boyfriend asked me how I pictured my life. My spontaneous response was: ‘I want to do something that makes a better world.’ That wish guided me, not only in writing and political activity, but also in the values I imparted to my children, all three of whom care deeply about fighting inequality, injustice, and abuse.

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19232015
Categories: 2013 Alumnae, Aleut Communities, Anthropology, Women's Therapy

Dorothy Jones grew up in Chicago during the Great Depression and dreamed of being a writer. With little encouragement from family or teachers, she abandoned writing and turned her attention to the social sciences, earning a B.A. degree in psychology and a master’s degree in Sociology from the University of Chicago.

After World War II, she married her sweetheart and, on his return from overseas service, they moved to Los Angeles. They had three children but a deteriorating marriage – and after 13 years, she divorced. Jones then returned to school for a second master’s degree, this one in Social Work.

Seven years later in 1963, when two of her children were nearly grown, Jones married Bob Jones. With her youngest child, they moved to Cold Bay, Alaska, a village of 150, on the western edge of the Alaska Peninsula, where her husband managed the Aleutian Islands National Wildlife Refuge.

Jones’ first visit to a nearby Aleut village excited her interest and she was determined to understand and write about the Aleut way of life. To equip herself for this task, she returned to the University of California, Berkeley, for a doctor’s degree in Social Work and was then hired by the Institute of Social and Economic Research at the University of Alaska as a professor in 1968. For the better part of the next 11 years, Jones visited many Aleut villages. During this time, she published four books and 10 papers and articles on various aspects of Aleut life, including history, demography, economy, material culture, family relations, race relations within the villages and between the villagers and outside welfare agencies.

Much of her work and writings focused on the lives of Alaska Natives and their communities. She wrote articles on sociology, anthropology, and clinical social work which were published in Anthropologica,Social Service Review, Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, and Clinical Social Work Journal. Several of her papers were also published by the Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska. Jones’ books include: Aleuts in Transition: A Comparison of Two Villages(1976), and A Century of Servitude: Pribilof Aleuts Under U.S. Rule (1980).

The second book portrays the U.S. government’s virtual enslavement of a group of Native Americans in the operation of a for-profit business on the remote Pribilof Islands. The government, as owners and managers of the Pribilof seal industry, paid their Aleut sealers in kind until 1962, required the Aleuts to obtain permission to leave the islands or have relatives from other villages visit, and dictated daily cultural routines such as bedtimes. This book contributed to the establishment of the Pribilof Trust to provide restitution to the citizens of the Pribilof Islands by the United State of America. The book is available online at her web site: www. dorjones.net .

When she and her family moved to Anchorage, she expanded her studies and writing to include urban Natives, the status of women in Alaska and women’s psychotherapy.  She left the University research institute in 1981 and turned her attention to women’s therapy. Jones helped organize a women’s therapy collective and, later, a private practice, as well as writing a number of clinical articles.

Jones was an outspoken champion of women’s rights in Alaska, serving as the chief author of a book documenting the leadership of women across the state , entitled: The Status of Women in Alaska, (Alaska State Commission on Human Rights, 1977). She also served on the Alaska Commission of Women, established by the state Legislature in 1978. She was also one of the founders of ALASKA WOMEN SPEAK, a periodical by and about women, and a founder of the counseling program at the Alaska Women’s Resource Center in Anchorage.

Jones also helped start the Feminist Scholarship fund at UAA, which has been named the Dorothy Jones fund, and is designated for scholarships to students who are working for women’s rights.

After the death of her husband, Jones left Alaska and settled in Washington state. There she began engaging in her childhood passion of creative writing. She wrote her first novel, Tatiana, which was inspired by her close relationship with an old Aleut woman known as chief of all the Aleutians. It is a compelling story of the struggles of Tatiana, her family and her village to survive a cultural onslaught. Tatiana is available at local book stores and through the publisher, University of Alaska Press.

Her second novel, When Shadows Fell, was inspired by her earlier experience as a grass-roots communist in Los Angeles. This book brings the reader into intimate contact with the inner life of the Communist Party and with the frightening parallel between the repression of the McCarthy era in the U.S.A. and the intimidation and erosion of civil rights in those troubled times. When Shadows Fell is available at most local bookstores and from the publisher, PublishAmerica, Box 151, Frederick, MD 21701. Currently, Jones is writing a novel set in 13th century England about the lives and relationships of three women – a noblewoman, a serf, and a Jewish money lender.

As an instructor, therapist and author, Jones inspired generations of women to engage in the fields of social work, anthropological research and community activism. She contributed to knowledge and theory about women’s counseling and therapy in Alaska and has been an outspoken advocate for women’s rights.

Publications by Dorothy M. Jones are listed below and can be found at the University of Alaska Anchorage archives in the UAA Library.

Box 1

Series 1. Published Writings by Dorothy M. Jones; 1964, 1966, 1969, 1970, 1972-1974, 1976, 1977, 1980-1982, 1990, 1991.
1. Dorothy M. Jones, M.S.W. “Binds and Unbinds.” Family Process 3(2): 323-331, September 1964.
2. Robert D. Jones, Jr. and Dorothy M. Jones. “The process of family disintegration in Black Brant.” In Wildflowl Trust 17th Annual Report (pp.75-78); 1966.
3. Dorothy M. Jones. “Child Welfare Problems in an Alaskan Native Village.” Social Services Review 43(3): 297-309, September 1969.
4. Dorothy Jones. “Agency-Community Conflict.” In Science in Alaska 1969, Proceedings, Twentieth Alaska Science Conference, College, Alaska, August 24 to August 27, 1969, edited by Eleanor C. Viereck. Alaska Division, American Association for the Advancement of Science, July 1970 (pp. 145-158).
5. Dorothy C. Jones. Changes in Population Structure In the Aleutian Islands. Fairbanks: Insitute of Social, Economic and Government Research, University of Alaska, December 1970 (ISEGR Research Note, No. A-2, 9 pp.).
6. Dorothy M. Jones. “Adaptation of Whites in an Alaska Native Village.” Anthropologica 14(2): 199-218, 1972.
7. Dorothy M. Jones. “Contemporary Aleut Material Culture.” In Modern Alaskan Material Culture, edited by Wendell Oswalt. Fairbanks: University of Alaska Museum, April 1972 (pp. 7-19).
8. Dorothy M. Jones, with the research assistance of John R. Wood. Patterns of Village Growth and Decline in the Aleutians. Fairbanks: Institute of Social, Economic and Government Research, University of Alaska, October 1973 (ISEGR Occasional Paper, No. 11).
9. Doroth M. Jones. “Race Relations in an Alaska Native Village.” Anthropologica 15(2): 167-190, 1973.
10. Dorothy M. Jones. The Urban Native Encounters the Social Service System. Fairbanks: Institute of Social, Economic and Governmental Research, University of Alaska, 1974 (69 pp., 3 copies).
11. Dorothy Jones and David G. Katzeek. Management & Program Evaluation, Social Services and Employment Assistance Programs, Cook Inlet Native Association, Inc. Juneau: Katzeek & Associates, ca. 1976 (60 pp.).
12. Dorothy M. Jones. Urban Native Men and Women–Differences in Their Work Adaptations. Fairbanks: Institute of Social, Ecomic and Goverment Research, University of Alaska, April 1976 (ISEGR Occasional Paper, No. 12, 45 pp.).
13. Dorothy M. Jones. Aleuts in Transition: A Comparison of Two Villages. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1976 (125 pp.).
14. Dorothy M. Jones. “Strategy Straddling: A Community Organization Dilemma in an Alaskan Native Village.” Human Organization 36 (1): 22-33, Spring 1977.
15. Dorothy M. Jones, Marsha Bennett, Mariana W. Foliart, Mary Ann VandeCastle, and Joan M. Katz. The Status of Women in Alaska, 1977. Juneau: Alaska State Commission for Human Rights, Jan. 1977 (156 pp.).
16. Dorothy Knee Jones. A Century of Servitude: Pribilof Aleuts Under U.S. Rule. Lanham, Maryland: University Press of America, 1980 (photo illus., 190 pp.).
17. Dorothy M. Jones, Principal Investigator, Anne Shinwin, and Mary Pete. Alcohol as a Community Problem and Response in Alaska: Final Report Summary. Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska, March 1981 (50 pp.).

 

Box 2

18. Dorothy M. Jones, Principal Investigator, Anne Shinwin, and Mary Pete. Alcohol as a Community Problem and Response in Alaska: Comprehensive Final Report. Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska, March 1981 (185 pp.).
19. Dorothy M. Jones. “Bulimia: A Food Binger’s Time Bomb.” Alaska Woman, pp. 28 & 30, June 1982.
20. Dorothy M. Jones, D.S.W. “Social Analysis in the Clinical Setting.” Clinical Social Work Journal 18(4): 393-406, Winter 1990.
21. Dorothy M. Jones. “Enmeshment in the American Family.” Affilia 6(2): 28-44, Summer 1991.
22. Dorothy M. Jones, DSW. “Alexithymia: Inner Speech and Linkage Impairment.” Clinical Social Work Journal 19(3): Fall 1991.



Photo of Jewel Jones 

Jewel Jones 

1943
Categories: 2013 Alumnae, Community Activism, Public Health

Jewel Jones has been a predominate force in Anchorage municipal government for 32 years. Serving at the will of six mayors, her responsibilities have included executive management of City of Anchorage Social Services Department and the Municipality of Anchorage Department of Health and Human Services. During her time in public service, Jones recruited and mentored hundreds of minority men and women to work in public services and was instrumental in shaping the municipal health system, establishing the Anchorage Senior Center, and advocating for services for low-income families.

Currently serving as executive director of the Anchorage Community Land Trust, a community development organization that invests in grass-roots, community-based projects, Jones has been instrumental in  helping to develop services and economic opportunities for the citizens of Mountain View, a low-income neighborhood of Anchorage.

In addition to her public and private service career, Jones has served on many boards and community groups, including the Alaska Housing Finance Corporation, where she helped to ensure senior housing projects were built across the state. Jones has worked tirelessly to provide opportunities for women and minorities in Alaska and has received many honors and awards for her advocacy and her work.

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1943
Categories: 2013 Alumnae, Community Activism, Public Health

Jewel Jones has been a predominate force in Anchorage municipal government for 32 years. Serving at the will of six mayors, her responsibilities have included executive management of City of Anchorage Social Services Department and the Municipality of Anchorage Department of Health and Human Services. During her time in public service, Jones recruited and mentored hundreds of minority men and women to work in public services and was instrumental in shaping the municipal health system, establishing the Anchorage Senior Center, and advocating for services for low-income families.

After leaving government service, Jones established her own consulting firm and spent several years providing business management consultation. She then took a “temporary” job as the interim executive director of the Anchorage Community Land Trust (ACLT) in 2007. ACLT is a community development organization that invests in grass-roots, community-based projects, specifically focusing on revitalizing Mountain View, a very low-income neighborhood in Anchorage. This temporary job has lasted six years and accomplished rehabilitation of a former abandoned furniture warehouse into a modern office building complex, facilitated bringing the first financial institution to Mountain View in more than 20 years, created affordable spaces for individual artist, and supports many community-based groups including William Tyson Elementary School.

Born in Oklahoma and an only child, Jones spent most of her primary years living with her paternal grandparents in Harlem, N.Y. One of the most memorable moments of her childhood was “having my grandmother walk to school with me every day and wait for me until school was out to walk back home.” Jones grew up with strong family influences. Her maternal grandmother owned oil-producing land in Oklahoma City. Being a woman of wealth in a segregated society, stores brought their goods to her home because she wasn’t allowed to shop openly in the department stores. Jones’ grandfather owned a soft-drink bottling company – ‘Jay Cola’ – during a time when a black person could not own a franchise, so their territory almost exclusively catered to the black community. Jones explains how her grandparents and parents “instilled a ‘can do’ and a ‘take-whatever-opportunity-is-before-you’ attitude and taught me to give it my best shot with full effort.” 

In addition to her public and private service career, Jones has been active on many boards and community groups, including the board of Commonwealth North, United Way of Anchorage and the board of Alaska Center for the Performing Arts. She also spent eight years as the chair of the board of the Alaska Housing Finance Corporation, where she helped to ensure that senior housing projects were built across the state. Jones has worked tirelessly to provide opportunities for women and minorities in Alaska and she has been active in the Alaska Black Caucus and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. With her close friend and colleague Eleanor Andrews, she was instrumental in the formation of the Anchorage Urban League which focuses on empowering young people, such as those who have aged out of foster care, but need assistance on their road to becoming contributing adults. She currently serves as a member of the board of trustees of Alaska Regional Hospital. She also has been the recipient of many honors and awards including the 2011 BP/YWCA Women of Achievement Award, the 2003 Anchorage Chamber of Commerce ATHENA Award, as well as “Citizen of the Year” from the National Association of Social Workers Alaska Chapter in 2001.



Photo of Mary Joyce 

Mary Joyce 

18991976
Categories: 2013 Alumnae, Adventure, Business

Mary Joyce was a pioneer southeast Alaska entrepreneur and adventurer. During the 1930s, she owned and operated a remote wilderness lodge, became the first woman radio operator in the Territory of Alaska, made a thousand-mile sled dog trip from Juneau to Fairbanks, and was a hunting guide, pilot, flight attendant, nurse, and candidate for Alaska Territorial Representative. She inspired news and magazine articles, poems, plays, books, movies, art and songs.

Joyce helped run the Taku Lodge in the 1930s with “Hack” Smith. The two added buildings, guided hunters and raised sled dogs. In 1935 she operated a radio station from the lodge for Pacific Alaska Airways’ Juneau-to-Fairbanks flight and became the first female radio operator in Alaska. In 1935 Joyce embarked with five dogs on a 1,000-mile, three-month overland trek to represent Juneau at the Fairbanks Winter Carnival. She also became one of the first female pilots in Juneau.

Because of her knowledge of the remote country, Joyce hauled radio equipment by dog team for the Navy as it built defenses during World War II, was a consultant for construction of the Alaska-Canada Highway, taught survival skills to troops, and helped develop a new air route from New York to Fairbanks.

In the 1940s, Joyce sold her lodge and moved to Juneau where she was a nurse at St. Ann’s Hospital and where she later purchased the Top Hat and Lucky Lady saloons. She led the statehood parade in Juneau and cut the ribbon for the first Iditarod trail race in 1973.

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18991976
Categories: 2013 Alumnae, Adventure, Business

Mary Joyce was a pioneer southeast Alaska entrepreneur and adventurer. During the 1930s, she owned and operated a remote wilderness lodge, became the first woman radio operator in the Territory of Alaska, made a thousand-mile sled dog trip from Juneau to Fairbanks, and was a hunting guide, pilot, flight attendant, nurse, and candidate for Alaska Territorial Representative. She inspired news and magazine articles, poems, plays, books, movies, art and songs.

In 1928 Mrs. Eric L. Smith, of the Charles Hackley lumber fortune, hired Joyce as a private nurse for her son, Leigh Hackley “Hack” Smith, a decorated French Foreign Legion veteran of World War I. The Smiths, with Joyce, traveled Alaska’s Inside Passage in 1929. They visited Twin Glacier Camp, established in 1923 by Dr. Harry C. DeVighne, a Juneau physician. Hack, struck by the area, purchased the camp, located 40 miles northeast of Juneau and accessible only by boat or floatplane. Hack and Joyce ran the lodge, added buildings, guided hunters and raised Taku husky sled dogs until 1934 when Hack died on a hunting trip. His mother bought the camp, including 15 sled dogs, and deeded it to Joyce who renamed it Taku Lodge. That winter Joyce operated a radio station at the lodge for Pacific Alaska Airways’ twice-weekly Juneau-to-Fairbanks flight. Joyce became the first female radio operator in Alaska.

In December 1935 Joyce embarked with five dogs on an overland trek to represent Juneau at the Fairbanks Winter Carnival. She hired Native guides or traveled alone on her three-month, 1,000 mile trip. National media covered her adventure, noting the great distance, bitter -60º F temperatures, primitive trails, and lack of communication, causing the American public to fear for her safety. Joyce flew the last leg to Fairbanks on March 26, 1936, where the mayor of Fairbanks awarded her a Silver Cup and the rare “Honorary Member” title from the Pioneers of Alaska. She completed her dog-mushing trip after the festival. “I wanted to see the country and experience some of the things the old-timers did,” she told reporters. “I just wanted to see if I could do it.” 

Because of her knowledge of the remote country, Joyce hauled radio equipment by dog team for the Navy as it built defenses during World War II, was a consultant for construction of the Alaska-Canada Highway, taught survival skills to troops, and helped develop a new air route from New York to Fairbanks. An Associated Press article, “Alaska Woman Could Give Soldiers Lessons in Defense,” she is quoted: “It’s nothing . . . Most Alaska women can take care of themselves.” Explorer Norman Dawn chose Joyce to co-star as Taku Mary in a film, Orphans of the North (1940), shot in the Taku River region. Another film, The Flying Saucer (1950), is loosely based on the lives of Joyce and Hack Smith.

One of the first female pilots in Juneau, Joyce ended her piloting days with wounded pride after she collided with fishing gear on Gastineau Channel. A certified nurse, she spent two years as a flight attendant for Pacific Alaska Airways, a subsidiary of Pan American Airways, traveling the Alaska-Seattle-Montana routes. In the 1940s, Joyce sold her lodge and moved to Juneau where she was a nurse at St. Ann’s Hospital and where she later purchased the Top Hat and Lucky Lady saloons. She led the statehood parade in Juneau and cut the ribbon for the first Iditarod trail race in 1973.

Joyce was born in Baraboo, Wis. Motherless at 18 months, she and her brother were raised by an aunt and uncle. Graduating from Mercy Nursing School in Chicago, she moved to Hollywood in 1928 and Alaska in 1929. Except for a short stay in Wisconsin in the 1940s, Joyce lived in the Juneau area until her death in 1976. She is buried in Evergreen Cemetery there. Today, Taku Glacier Lodge draws thousands of tourists each year and visitors can see the dogsled Joyce used on her 1,000-mile journey. In 2012 the Juneau Jazz & Classics group premiered a composition about Joyce written by her grandniece, titled “Nothing to Lose.”

 

Additional resources:
Alaska State Library, Historical Collections, Mary Joyce Collection.
Baldwin, Bert. “Mary Joyce’s Thousand Miles on Snow,” poem in Northern Highlights and Mary Joyce. Bert Baldwin, 1976. 
Bell, Karen and Janet Shelfer. Taku: Four Amazing Individuals—Four Incredible Life Stories and the Alaskan Wilderness Lodge That Brought Them Together. Birmingham, Alabama: Will Publishing, 2006.
Greiner, Mary Anne. Mary Joyce: Taku to Fairbanks, 1,000 Miles by Dogteam. Bloomington, Indian: Author House, 2007.
Kolkhorst Ruddy, Kathy, personal communication, kathy.ruddy65@gmail.com
Twin Glacier Camp, National Register of Historic Places documentation. 1988.



Photo of Thelma (Perse) Langdon

Thelma (Perse) Langdon

19252012
Categories: 2013 Alumnae, Activist, Education, Elder Care, Mental Health

Thelma Langdon is known for her advocacy, activism and volunteering for education, mental health and the challenges of aging. Her leadership on the state Board of Education and a wide number of community non-profit organizations epitomized her commitment to improving lives and finding ways to accomplish her goals. She exemplified how human efforts can make a powerful and positive difference in the lives of others.

Settling in Anchorage in 1958 with her psychiatrist husband, Dr. J. Ray Langdon, she became involved with Providence Medical Auxiliary and Anchorage Mental Health Association, taking on leadership roles in several advocacy programs aimed at creating greater awareness in the general public about mental health. Later Langdon served on the Alaska state Mental Health Board where she actively promoted the responsible revision of the provisions for the use of lands dedicated by the Alaska State Constitution to the support of mental health programs so that they would provide the revenues needed to make improvements in those programs.

Langdon’s civic involvement in activities to provide for children was carried out in numerous organizations where she always sought ways to work together to meet needs and improve services. This led her to be selected the Southcentral Regional Delegate for Alaska at the White House Conference on Children and Youth.

As years went by and she assumed the role of primary caregiver for her father, her attention turned to issues associated with the challenges of aging. Also after her husband passed away at home, Langdon became a strong advocate and supporter of hospice and became active with the Alzheimer’s Disease Family Support Group. Her last leadership role was as the head of the Older Persons Action Group where she led major institutional and financial reform.

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19252012
Categories: 2013 Alumnae, Activist, Education, Elder Care, Mental Health

In 1959 Langdon began her involvement in education with Turnagain Elementary School Parent-Teachers Association, where her efforts supported the teachers involved with her children. She continued these activities at the state level where she served as state PTA president and her even-handed, dedicated and visionary leadership contributions to that organization were recognized when Gov. Jay Hammond appointed her to the Alaska state Board of Education in 1975 where she later served as president. In that capacity, she traveled throughout Alaska to many rural communities and always had wonderful stories to tell about the exceptional people she met during those visits. These travels intensified her commitment to seeing that the resources were available and programs were developed that would meet the various needs of the different populations throughout the state.
Langdon later served on the board of Alaska Commission on Post-Secondary Education (1978-82), and on various committees of the Anchorage school district. Through her involvement in educational organizations, Langdon became aware of the many vulnerable children who had little and whose living circumstances were harsh. She realized that these conditions greatly limited the ability of such children to acquire the full benefits of education. This led her to join and participate in the Child Welfare League of America, a national organization dedicated to bring attention and resources to these issues.
At the state level she actively pursued these same objectives. She was instrumental in the creation of the Alaska Office of Child Advocacy in 1971 and served on its board of directors. That commitment is also evident in her founding role in the creation of Action for Alaska’s Children in 1990. In Anchorage she was instrumental in the creation of Big Brothers/Big Sisters, a program designed to provide support for children. She became a strong advocate and supporter of that program.
Langdon served as a role model throughout her life. Her hallmark style was always to work together in a non-confrontational manner and to seek to bridge differences. She did, however, recognize that at certain junctures one had to stand up and fight for principles to accomplish what was right. She especially showed fierce determination to see that the Mental Health Trust Lands set aside by the state constitution should truly be devoted to acquiring the best possible returns from the lands and not simply be a pass-through for cheap land acquisitions by powerful business interests.
Fellow members of boards and non-profit organizations recognized this tough, resilient quality of dedicated persistence in the pursuit of principled actions by honoring her with numerous awards such as: 1993 Mental Health Association, Natalie Gottstein Memorial Award; 1989 Alaska Alliance of the Mentally Ill – Outstanding Dedication and Service to the Mental Health Community; 1988 Mental Health Advocate of the Year – Alaska Mental Health Association; 1987 Women Helping Women Award – Soroptimist International of Anchorage and Soroptimist International of Cook Inlet; 1973 state PTA Humanitarian Award; and in 1963 Honorary Member of Alaska State Medical Association.
Some but not all of the groups that Langdon gave her time to include:
NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS: 1984-88 American Association of Retired Persons, State Legislative Committee; 1975-83 National Association of State Boards of Education; 1974-76, American Medical Association Auxiliary Board of Directors; 1971-75, National PTA Board of Managers.

STATE ORGANIZATIONS: 1970-73 Alaska Mental Health Association Board of Directors; 1958 Alaska PTA, honorary life member and 1971-75 state president; 1958-1985 Alaska State Medical Society Auxiliary and 1970-74 state president.

SERVICE TO THE STATE OF ALASKA: 1988-1993 Alaska Mental Health Board, 1990, chairman; 1978-82 Alaska Commission on Postsecondary Education and 1982 vice president; 1975-80, Alaska State Board of Education and 1978-80 president; 1971-74 Board of Directors, Alaska Office of Child Advocacy and 1973-74 secretary-treasurer; 1970 White House Conference on Children & Youth; chairman, Southcentral Region, delegate to Washington, DC.

LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS: 1990 Action for Alaska’s Children, founding member; 1987-91 Anchorage Child Advocacy, network member; 1985-87 board of directors, Widowed Persons Service; 1985-86 AARP Sourdough Chapter, vice president: 1984-88, board of directors, Alzheimer’s Disease Family Support Group: 1980-82 steering committee for formation, board of directors, Hospice of Anchorage: 1974-76 board of directors, Anchorage Arts Council; 1973-79 board of directors, Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Anchorage – 1977 secretary and 1978 vice president; 1968-70 board of directors, Anchorage Mental Health Association; 1959-1976 Turnagain Elementary School PTA – 1965-66 president and 1964-65 secretary; 1958-74 Providence Hospital Auxiliary – 1974 Honorary Life Member, 1970 Volunteer of the Year, 1968 secretary, 1967 treasurer, 1963, president and gift shop bookkeeper for three years.

CIVIC ACTIVITIES: 1986-96 Zonta Club of Anchorage; 1984-90 Municipality of Anchorage Senior Citizens Advisory Commission; 1982-96 Day Break Adult Day Care, Advisory Committee; May 1981 Child Welfare League of America, Regional Conference, Steering Committee and Local Arrangements Committee Chairman; 1971-75 Health Education Curriculum Committee, Anchorage School District; 1970-73 FISH (Friends in Service to Humanity) volunteer; 1968-70 secretary-treasurer, Rotary Anns, Anchorage.
Langdon was awarded her registered nursing degree in 1946 from Minnequa School of Nursing in Pueblo, Colo. She also received additional college credits from St. Louis University and University of Alaska Anchorage. She met J. Ray Langdon, her husband of 34 years, when he was a patient at the hospital where she was working in Pueblo. She found him obnoxious in his flirtations in the beginning, but succumbed to his charms and married him August 20, 1947. Together they lived in six different states between 1947 and 1958 before settling in Anchorage and building their home in Turnagain, where she was able to display her passion for flower gardening. There they raised two boys and three girls.

References:
Anchorage Daily News, Obituary, August 24, 2012
http://www.hospiceofanchorage.org/about-us/history/
http://jukebox.uaf.edu/site/people/thelma-langdon
http://www.alaska.net/~mhaa/news/awardshst.html



Photo of Emily Morgan  

Emily Morgan  

18781960
Categories: 2013 Alumnae, Community Service, Health

Trained as a registered nurse and a public health nurse by the Red Cross in Wichita, Kan., Emily Morgan was responsible for administering the serum that was brought to Nome via the famous Iditarod Serum Run for the diphtheria epidemic of 1925. She was named the “Angel of the Yukon” for saving the Natives of Nome from the “black death” during that epidemic, according to Wichita newspapers. Her work stopped the spread of that deadly disease to other villages in the Arctic during one of the greatest health crises Alaska has ever seen.

During the First World War, Morgan had a commission in the Army Reserve Nurses Corps. She served for three years in France, Germany, Italy, Belgium, England and Australia. While working back home as the first public health nurse in Wichita, she asked for missionary work, which brought her to Alaska for 15 years: the Jesse Lee Orphanage in Unalaska, the Maynard-Columbia Hospital in Nome and the hospital in Barrow. Morgan performed her job in Nome under the harshest of conditions – an epidemic in a rural Alaska village, a race to bring serum by dogsled delayed by blizzards, rising numbers of diphtheria cases and a serum that then had to be safely unfrozen before it could be used with patients.

While on furlough in Kansas in 1928, Morgan was called back to Nome to help fight the smallpox epidemic in northern Alaska. In 1935 she was in charge of the Barrow Hospital when the bodies of Wiley Post and Will Rogers were brought in from their plane crash on August 15. Post, a famous American aviator, and Rogers, celebrated as “America’s favorite Hollywood actor” just the year before, were on a vacation to Alaska and crashed just after takeoff near Point Barrow.

Morgan died in Kansas in 1960 at the age of 82.

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18781960
Categories: 2013 Alumnae, Community Service, Health

Trained as a registered nurse and a public health nurse by the Red Cross in Wichita, Kan., Emily Morgan was responsible for administering the serum that was brought to Nome via the famous Iditarod Serum Run for the diphtheria epidemic of 1925. She was named the “Angel of the Yukon” for saving the Natives of Nome from the “black death” during that epidemic, according to Wichita newspapers. Her work stopped the spread of that deadly disease to other villages in the Arctic during one of the greatest health crises Alaska has ever seen.

During the First World War, Morgan had a commission in the Army Reserve Nurses Corps. She served for three years in France, Germany, Italy, Belgium, England and Australia. While working back home as the first public health nurse in Wichita, she asked for missionary work, which brought her to Alaska for 15 years: the Jesse Lee Orphanage in Unalaska, the Maynard-Columbia Hospital in Nome and the hospital in Barrow. Morgan performed her job in Nome under the harshest of conditions – an epidemic in a rural Alaska village, a race to bring serum by dogsled delayed by blizzards, rising numbers of diphtheria cases and a serum that then had to be safely unfrozen before it could be used with patients.

A volume of biographies of Kansas notables described Morgan’s role:

While waiting for the antitoxin to arrive, Miss Morgan ministered to the ill through the long days and nights, never faltering as she added new dignity to the name of nurse.  

Morgan was called back to Nome while on furlough in Kansas in 1928 to help fight the smallpox epidemic in northern Alaska. Before leaving Alaska, she was in charge of the Barrow Hospital when the bodies of Wiley Post and Will Rogers were brought in from their plane crash on August 15, 1935. Post, a famous American aviator, and Rogers, celebrated as “America’s favorite Hollywood actor” just the year before, were on a vacation to Alaska and crashed just after takeoff near Point Barrow.

Morgan was born in Butler County, Kan., on March 7, 1878, the daughter of pioneering farmers and one of seven siblings. She graduated from Leon High School in 1897 and taught school before entering nurse’s training. She never married and died in El Dorado, Kan., in May of 1960 at the age of 82. She also served as a missionary nurse in Panama before nursing in New Zealand when World War II broke out in 1939.  She had traveled to New Zealand on a furlough to visit and minister to an ill sister, but it was unsafe to travel, and she remained at her hospital post long after the war ended.

Additional Resources: 

Blizzard delays Nome relief dogs in the final dash. (Feb. 2, 1925). The New York Times (reporting news from Nome, AK, Feb. 1, Associated Press.)  

Emily Morgan – “Angel of the Yukon.” (1980). In The Kingdom of Butler – Her People. Lawrence P. Klintworth (Ed.) El Dorado, Kansas: Butler County Historical Society, pp. 150-151.

Emily Morgan of El Dorado Risked Life to Save Hundreds in Dread Diptheria Scurge. Wichita Eagle Magazine, May 19, 1957.

Hurries to Alaska. The Topeka Capital, December 23, 1928.

Heroine of Nome Epidemic in Public Service 50 Years. Wichita Morning Eagle, Aug. 2, 1947.

The official website of Will Rogers. (retrieved from http://www.cmgww.com/historic/rogers/ February 3, 2013. )



Photo of Ruth E. Moulton 

Ruth E. Moulton 

19312006
Categories: 2013 Alumnae, Community Activism

Ruth Moulton was a community activist, educator, outdoors woman – and the person considered most responsible for the establishment of Anchorage’s Town Square Park. Moulton grew up in the small town of Standish, Maine. When she made Alaska her home in l960, she brought with her the town-meeting philosophy engrained in her New England upbringing. Getting the Town Square Park established on a city block in the heart of downtown Anchorage engaged Ruth off and on for nearly 25 years filled with initiatives, petitions, legal battles and personal perseverance. While many Alaskans were involved in the Town Square project over the years, it was Ruth Moulton who is credited with spearheading the battles to achieve success.

A 2006 Anchorage Assembly resolution honoring Moulton’s accomplishment reads in part: “…Ruth left her mark on everything she was determined to accomplish with her vocal and steady civic presence, an unwavering, principled community activist who worked twenty-five years through elections and lawsuits to help bring the Town Square project to fruition… .”

A founding member of Friends of Neighborhoods, Moulton was a champion of community councils and was significantly involved in the Fairview and South Addition community councils for two decades. Up to the time of her death, she fought for the survival of Fairview as a safe neighborhood.

A 2007 resolution of the Anchorage Public Facilities Advisory Commission reads in part: “…all of Anchorage has benefited from Ruth Moulton’s tireless advocacy for parks, trails, gardens, and her Fairview neighborhood…” The resolution refers to Moulton as the “linchpin” in the creation of Town Square Park, and concludes… “ the Park has become the symbolic heart of the city of Anchorage …”

After her death, the Anchorage Assembly, 16 community councils and numerous individuals petitioned for Moulton’s achievements to be publically recognized. The Ruth Moulton Plaza in Town Square Park was dedicated in 2010.

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19312006
Categories: 2013 Alumnae, Community Activism

Ruth Moulton was born in l931 in Portland, Maine, and grew up on the family apple orchard in the small town of Standish, Maine. Her family wrote: “As a girl, she read Jack London’s ‘Call of the Wild’ and was so inspired that she and her dog started right off for Alaska. She got only a short way down the road when Grandpa Moulton caught up with her and brought her home.”

Moulton graduated from the University of Maine in l952 with a Bachelor of Arts in Education and in l957 from Columbia University with a Master of Arts in Public Law and Government. She taught at a Maine high school, then after visiting Alaska in l959 and “feeling at home” the minute she stepped off the plane, she moved here permanently in l960.

Moulton taught English, history and social studies for several years at East High School, later worked for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, and, in between, had a number of other jobs, including researcher and taxi driver. In l973 she returned to Harvard University for a Certificate of Advanced Study in Learning Environments. For many years, she supported herself as an independent tax-preparer.

Moulton is remembered as a community activist and as an outdoorswoman. She was an active hiker and explorer all her life. She climbed Mount Kilimanjaro. She hiked the Chilkoot Pass three times and bicycled all over Alaska. At 75 and just diagnosed with cancer, Moulton hiked seven miles to a cabin on Resurrection Pass carrying a 35 pound pack. “She loved to organize her friends lives,” recalls John Blaine. “She would set up hiking trips over Resurrection Pass. She would arrange solstice parties where we would burn red underwear and everyone who came had to write a poem. She made people feel more active, more alive, more involved.” 

Moulton was a member of the Anchorage Unitarian Universalist Fellowship and a longtime resident of the Fairview community where she “lived the town-meeting philosophy” engrained in her New England upbringing as a tireless neighborhood advocate. Her efforts for the protection and safety of her Fairview neighborhood and for all neighborhoods; her appreciation of community councils as grass-roots democracy in action; her advancement of parks, trails, gardens, viewed in terms of civic responsibility, were her hallmarks. Moulton was strongly supportive of the not-yet-built extension of the Tony Knowles Coastal Trail to Potter Marsh and when she learned that an inland route was under consideration, she rounded up 5,000 signatures in support of the coastal route. She is credited with successfully involving hundreds of men and women in community projects she believed were important.

“Ruth never badgered anyone to help her,” Blaine says. “She was just always so sure. She would say ‘I am going to do this. Will you join me?’ She never hesitated to lead; she never complained about how difficult things were for her. She just set out to accomplish whatever it was that needed doing. She persevered through daunting opposition. She provided a strong role model for many men and women in Anchorage who learned from her example how individuals affected by governmental actions could play an effective part in governmental processes.” 

Moulton’s legacy is her persistent long-term championship for the creation and protection of Anchorage’s Town Square Park. The saga begins in l965 when Anchorage voters approved an Anchorage Garden Club-initiated petition for a city park where the Egan Convention Center now stands. The voters approved – but no action was taken. In l981 the Assembly approved building a convention center at that site. Moulton publically stated that such an action would be counter to the public vote. A lawsuit was brought to stop the convention center, but failed. Undaunted after losing the lawsuit, Moulton led a successful petition drive to reestablish the park. The Municipality responded with an alternative proposal to move the park one block south. The proposal passed, but nothing more happened.

In l984 Moulton led another petition drive to put a Charter Amendment on the ballot to set aside Block 51 (the present site of Town Square Park) for a park. The Ballot Measure passed with 75 percent of the vote. In l985 Block 51 was still being used as a parking lot. Moulton led another public crusade that resulted in legal action. This time it was successful and work began in earnest on the park.

In l987 the work on the park was halted because buildings remained on Block 51. Moulton’s group of park enthusiasts again threatened legal action and the necessary demolition was begun. She worked for two years with the Town Square Advisory Committee on the design and development of the Town Square Park that we have today; but organized another petition drive that stopped a road from going through the park.

At the time of her death, Moulton was working on an advisory committee to Mayor Mark Begich (now U.S. Senator Begich) regarding proposed changes to Town Square. Mayor Begich is reported as telling her, with a smile, that any changes would need her approval to go forward.

In an Anchorage Daily News article after her death, Mayor Begich was quoted as saying in reference to the Town Square Park: “Without Ruth Moulton, I don’t even think it would have existed.” 

Moulton was named a YWCA Woman of Achievement in l994 for her lead role in the establishment of the Town Square Park and her accomplishments in civic action.

In a 2005 article on “My Favorite Parks,” Moulton wrote:

Every town needs a central place, some sort of ‘town square.’ Such a place serves to create and solidify a community identity; it helps create a ‘there’ there, if you will. And while adding valuable open space and softness in the midst of hard surfaces and structures, it serves many other purposes, some of which are important, even basic, to a good community.

“Its openness makes it a place of refreshment in all seasons as it brings in light to the center of the city; there are gorgeous flowers in the summer and ice skating in the winter; there are autumn colors in our brief fall, and that optimistic, almost joyous, bright green in spring. It provides a bit of respite during a brief walk from corner to corner, and a calm retreat during a lunch-hour spent reading, half-dozing in the sun. 

“As important, it serves as a place for people to gather – to watch fireworks in celebration or to light candles in mourning; to listen to a military band or to petition their government; to celebrate a holiday season or a culture community; to meet in silent commemoration or listen to oratory. 

“For these and many other reasons, Town Square is my favorite park.”

The next year, in 2006, Ruth Moulton died. Over the next three years there were public and private resolutions recommending a public acknowledgement of Moulton’s role as a community activist and, more specifically, her leadership role in establishing the Town Square Park. In 2010 the Ruth Moulton Plaza was dedicated at Town Square Park.

Every April 1, on her birthday, her friends John Blaine and Dianne Holmes visit the Ruth Moulton Plaza in the Town Square Park. They bring a box with a sign that reads: “SOAP BOX,” a portable mike, homemade cookies and coffee. Anyone passing by is invited to share the cookies and coffee, get up on the Soap Box and give civil discourse on any subject they choose. “It’s very funky,” John says. “I think Ruth would enjoy it.”

 

References:

 

A Resolution of the Anchorage Municipal Assembly Remembering the Life and Contributions of Ruth Moulton to the City of Anchorage and Requesting That Her Name Be Submitted to the Public Facilities Advisory Commission With a Recommendation To Designate Anchorage’s Town Square or a Significant Integral Feature Thereof in Her Memory (Approved 12/19/06)

 

Municipality of Anchorage Parks & Recreation Commission Resolution 2007-12 Naming Town Square Park to Commemorate Ruth Moulton. (Approved March 8, 2007)

 

Public Facilities Advisory Commission: Resolution 2007-03: A Resolution of the Public Facilities Advisory Commission Recommending Assembly Action to Name Town Square Park in honor of Ruth Moulton (March 28, 2007)

 

Anchorage Daily News: November 18, 2006: Ruth Moulton was a rock until the end. COMMUNITY ACTIVIST: Cancer silences active Anchorage woman. By Rosemary Shinohara

 

Anchorage Daily News: November 22, 2006 Obituaries: Ruth Moulton



Photo of Marie (Matsuno) Nash 

Marie (Matsuno) Nash 

1943
Categories: 2013 Alumnae, Advocacy, Human Rights

Marie Matsuno Nash has a very long and deep history of contributions to the people and communities of Alaska – both rural and urban – as a professional and volunteer with non-profits. Currently, Nash serves as the board secretary of the Japan Relief Fund of Alaska Foundation  and has been instrumental in JPRF’s efforts to raise donations and awareness of the Great East Japan Earthquake /Tsunami that Japan experienced in 2011. Nash was born in the Minidoka Internment Camp in Idaho where her Aleut Mother and Japanese-American father, along with her older brother, were interned during World War II. After the war, her family returned to Ugashik, Alaska, her mother’s village. From the fourth grade she was schooled in Haines and returned home during the summer to commercial fish and assist in the food preservations for winter. These life experiences greatly influenced her advocacy and humanitarian work.

Her distinguished career in politics started at the University of Alaska when she met Howard Pollock during his campaign for Congress. After graduating, she worked for Pollock in his office in Washington, D.C. This was followed by working for Governor Hammond and Senator Stevens.

To quote her nominators Tony Nakazawa and Irene Rowan: “Nash is a truly genuine person who is committed to helping individuals in a crisis, serving at all levels, going above and beyond the norm in helping individuals and community organizations.” Joy LeDoux Mendoza, former high school and college intern for Senator Stevens, says Nash “served as my mentor then and currently as a second mother.” She remembers Nash for the home cooked meals she supplied to many interns and, “how she guided me gracefully to overcome the mistakes I made along the way.”

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1943
Categories: 2013 Alumnae, Advocacy, Human Rights

Marie Nash’s father was a Japanese-American, born in Hawaii, who came to Alaska to fish and met her mother in the Aleut village of Ugashik. When World War II broke out, her father was sent to an internment camp and her mother insisted that she belonged with him. That is where Nash was born. After the war, the now larger family returned to the small Bristol Bay village where the family resumed commercial set-net fishing. Because there was no school in Ugashik, Nash was taught by her parents using Calvert Correspondence School methods until she was eight. Then she was sent hundreds of miles away to the public school in Haines where she lived at a children’s home known as Haines House. The residence also housed orphans, wards of the state and other borders from small villages without schools. The cost of transportation and housing had to be borne by her family because the head of her household was not Native, therefore the Bureau of Indian Affairs would not pay.

In high school Nash lived with a doctor’s family in Haines serving as their babysitter to help offset the cost of her food and lodging. She returned home every summer to help with the catching and drying of fish, berry picking and with the vegetable garden.

Nash’s distinguished career in politics started at the University of Alaska where she was a member of Young Republicans and served as a campus tour guide for Howard Pollock during his campaign for Congress. After graduating, she traveled to Washington, D.C., where she worked in his office. Moving to Juneau she worked briefly for the very politically connected law firm of Banfield, Boochever & Dugan. She served as executive secretary to Gov. Jay Hammond, staff assistant to boards and commissions, and deputy commissioner of Community and Regional Affairs. She served as a staff assistant to Sen. Ted Stevens in his Washington office and was his state director in the Alaska Office. She retired after 29 years in October 2004.

Many organizations and committees benefitted from Nash’s commitment to public service. She is currently the secretary of the Japan Relief Fund of Alaska Foundation (JPRF) and vice president of the Japanese American Citizens League – Alaska Chapter. She was Chairman and President of the Bristol Bay Native Corporation Education Foundation. and board member for BBNC, director and secretary on the board of the First Alaskans Institute, a member of Ugashik Traditional Village Council Elders, treasurer of the Anchor Presbyterian Church and YWCA board member. She was a member of Anchorage’s Downtown Rotary Club, where she chaired the military committee and served on the scholarship committee. Nash also served as a bell ringer for the Salvation Army’s Red Kettle Program.

In 1967 Nash was selected the University of Alaska Fairbanks Student of the Year, and in 2008 she received the UAF Alumni Achievement Award for Community Support from the UAF Alumni Association. The American Red Cross, Alaska Southcentral Chapter presented Nash with a plaque in appreciation of her fundraising efforts when the Red Cross purchased what is now known as the Ann Stevens Red Cross Building. Certificates of appreciation were presented to Nash from the U.S. Army Alaska for help with America’s Arctic Warriors; the Anchorage School District and the Gifted Mentorship Program for sharing time and talent with mentorship students (one Dimond High student still keeps in periodic touch with her from New York City where she lives and works) and from the Federal Emergency Management Agency for help with the severe winter storms and avalanches in Alaska.

Nash is known widely for her work as a public official (both in the state and federal governments) to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act, Denali Commission, reparations related to Alaska Japanese-Americans and Alaska Native Americans incarcerated in relocation camps during WWII.

Nash serves as a role model for many of the former interns, both men and women, by becoming their friends, their second mothers and grandmothers to their own children, never forgetting a birthday or holiday wish. She shares with them her love of picking wild berries and making jam. “I have learned from Marie the secret in life is keeping in touch with your friends and sharing special moments together when you can,” Joy LeDoux Mendoza, former high school and college intern with U.S. Sen. Ted Stevens’ office.

Nash graduated in 1967 with a bachelor’s degree in Sociology from the University of Alaska. She is married and has one son. 

References:
http://www.3cjujirowadamemorialassociation.com/?p=635

http://www.worldcat.org/title/marie-matsuno-nash-is-interviewed-by-ron-inouye-on-february-23-1991-in-anchorage-alaska/oclc/309441390

http://consortiumlibrary.org/archives/FindingAids/hmc-0374.html

http://consortiumlibrary.org/archives/CollectionsList/CollectionDescriptions/hmc-0451cd.html

Alaska’s Japanese Pioneers: Faces, Voices, Stories; copyrighted 1994 by Alaska’s Japanese Pioneers Research Project. Written by Ron Inouye, Carol Hoshiko and Kazumi Heshiki sponsored by the Alaska Historical Society ISBN 60 Pages



Photo of S. Anne Newell

S. Anne Newell

1946
Categories: 2013 Alumnae, Human Rights, Public Safety

Anne Newell spent 23 years as an Anchorage police officer and detective. At 27 she was the first female police officer at the Anchorage Police Department with powers of arrest.

When she arrived in September 1973 she applied to APD with an associate degree in Science in Law Enforcement and with some police experience. Newell had no idea how difficult the job would be and how much time would pass before she would be as an employed APD officer. At the end of the first interview, she said: “The response was that ‘we do not employ women to be police officers.” Newell filed her lawsuit with the State Human Rights Commission against APD and the City of Anchorage.

She sued to provide women the opportunity to be police officers at APD so they could show they could do the job. The suit took more than two years to settle; in the interim Newell became a volunteer auxiliary police officer, working with victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. At the same time she was working full time at East High school, and with her husband raised six children.

Her suit was settled in November, 1975, so she was able to attend a Police Academy and become a sworn officer.  While on the police force she endured the rude, vulgar and shortsighted behavior from some of her male counterparts. Her success as a police officer made it easier for other women to become sworn officers.

She received the Alaska Women in Police award of Achievement in 1996, for successfully arresting sex offenders who were prosecuted and imprisoned. She retired after 23 years with the Anchorage Police Department.

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1946
Categories: 2013 Alumnae, Human Rights, Public Safety

Anne Newell spent 23 years as an Anchorage police officer and detective. At 27 she was the first female police officer at the Anchorage Police Department with powers of arrest.

When she arrived in September 1973 she applied to APD with an associate degree in Science in Law Enforcement and with some police experience. Newell had no idea how difficult the job would be and how much time would pass before she would be as an employed APD officer. At the end of the first interview, she said: “The response was that ‘we do not employ women to be police officers.” Newell filed her lawsuit with the State Human Rights Commission against APD and the City of Anchorage.

She sued to provide women the opportunity to be police officers at APD so they could show they could do the job. The suit took more than two years to settle; in the interim Newell became a volunteer auxiliary police officer, working with victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. At the same time she was working full time at East High school, and with her husband raised six children.

Her suit was settled in November, 1975, so she was able to attend a Police Academy and become a sworn officer.  While on the police force she endured the rude, vulgar and shortsighted behavior from some of her male counterparts. Her success as a police officer made it easier for other women to become sworn officers.

In 1976 she started as a patrol officer and four years later was transferred to APD’s Public Relations Section, where she did the traffic report, “Air Watch,” with KIMO television and Wilber’s Aircraft. In 1983, she went to Detectives and Burglary Section and subsequently moved into the new statewide Exploitation/Crimes Against Children Unit, where she worked closely with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. She devoted 12 years to the Crimes Against Children Unit until she retired after 20+ years of service. She received the Alaska Women in Police award of Achievement in 1996, for successfully arresting sex offenders who were prosecuted and imprisoned.

Newell was born in California, was raised in many states and lived with relatives, friends of her mother’s, and in foster homes – all of which provided her with empathy for children in abusive homes. A significant influence about family life was Newell’s Sicilian mother-in-law, Clementine Audino, who lived with Ann, her husband and her seven children for many summers while Newell and her husband worked. Many of their children were foster children and were the beneficiaries of Audino’s consistent care and affection.

Newell also served as a lobbyist for the Anchorage Peace Officers Association, and therefore, traveled to Juneau and Washington, D.C., discussing proposed legislation. After Newell retired, she was a candidate in 1996 for the Alaska House of Representatives, where she won her primary election, but lost in the general.
During her career she volunteered for political campaigns as well as for KAKM/KSKA, public television and radio stations. In 1992 she joined Zonta International, becoming a volunteer tutor/teacher at the Anchorage Literacy Project. She continues there to this day as a board member and an active volunteer tutor. She creates a fun environment for her literacy students, where laughter is often heard from her classroom.

Newell has worked at many jobs but being a police officer was the most rewarding. However, she was pleased to have a chapter she wrote be accepted for publication in the 4th volume of “Chicken Soup for the Soul”. She has also been a storyteller with the Storytellers’ Guild of Anchorage.

Awards

  • 1994 Municipal Employee of the Year nomination, because of her efforts to arrest and prosecute sex offenders. Newell was nominated by citizens who went through Standing Together Against Rape counseling.
  • 1996 Alaska Women in Police award of Achievement for successfully arresting sex offenders who were prosecuted and imprisoned.
  • 2010 Golden Heart Volunteer Service Award, Outstanding Community Service
  • Volunteerism in Alaska
  • KAKM/ KSKA, 25years
  • Political Campaigns
  • Kindergarten Classroom w/ Kelly Carpenter nine years
  • HOBY Hugh O’Brian Youth Leadership Foundation, 1984-1994
  • Z-Club (Zonta), 1992-1995
  • Basically Bach Board, three years
  • Anchorage Literacy Project 1993-2006, 2009-2013 tutor/teacher, board
  • Anchorage Conflict Resolution Board, three years
  • Anchorage Soil and Water Conservation District Board and citizen member 2003-2005

Affiliations:

  • Alaska Peace Officer Assn. Life member
  • Toastmistress International (International Training in Communications) Life member
  • Bartlett Democratic Club member many years
  • Alaska Women’s Political Caucus member many years
  • Zonta International Club of Anchorage 20 years
  • Anchorage Genealogical Society
  • Another first: First female officer to retire from APD with 20+ years of service.