Mildred Robinson Hermann

Mildred Robinson Hermann

1891 – 1964

Achievements in: law, public service, education

Mildred Hermann was a lawyer, an articulate spokesperson on statehood for Alaska, a forceful delegate of the Alaska Constitutional Convention, a wife and mother, and a lifelong advocate for research and treatment of tuberculosis, which was so prevalent in Alaska. She was born in Indiana, taught school for nine years, and came to Juneau, Alaska, in 1919, where she began her study of the law with James Wickersham. She was admitted to the Alaska Bar in 1934 and was the first woman to practice law in Juneau. She was a defense attorney for poor clients.

From 1949-59, Mildred Hermann served as Secretary of the Alaska Statehood Commission, the official organization responsible for organizing statewide support for Alaska’s admittance into the Union. At the Constitutional Convention Mildred was elected the Temporary President on the first day of the convention and was chosen as the delegate to close the convention, in honor of her long service on behalf of statehood. Mildred was an imposing woman and was most comfortable with a rolling pin in her hand, which she kept on her desk to accentuate her points. The convention lasted 75 days and with the wave of her rolling pin, Mildred reminded her colleagues daily of the volume of work to be accomplished to meet the schedule. After the convention, she became a reporter for the Anchorage Times covering the state legislature and the new state government she had helped to launch.